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Meet First Nations Designer Nicole Monks



IMAGE > Nicole Monks, birli nganmanha (eating together) [detail], 2021, grass tree resin, kangaroo skatt, charcoal, driftwood, river reed, shell, kangaroo teeth, echidna quill and eucalyptus, dimensions variable. Image courtesy of the artist.

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Meet First Nations multi-disciplinary creative Nicole Monks of Warjarri Yamaji Dutch and English heritage in an intimate conversation with Linden Director Melinda Martin. Nicole will discuss her large-scale commission birli nganmanha (eating together) that features crockery and cutlery made from traditional materials found on country.

There will be opportunities for you to ask questions and get involved.

This event will be Auslan interpreted.

WHEN
> Saturday 09 October 2021
TIME
> 2PM to 3PM
ACCESS > Live on YouTube and Facebook
COST
> FREE

Replay on Facebook Replay on Youtube


First Nations Commission awarded to Nicole Monks

Leading First Nations multi-disciplinary creative Nicole Monks has been awarded Design Fringe’s First Nation Commission. Nicole will receive $10,000 to realise her work birli nganmanha (eating together) that will form the centrepiece of the re-invigorated Fringe Furniture exhibition.

Nicole Monks is a multi-disciplinary creative of Wajarri Yamaji, Dutch and English heritage living, currently working on Country, WA. Monk’s practice is informed by her cross-cultural identity, using storytelling as a way to connect the past with the present and future. Her works take a conceptual approach that are embedded with narratives and aim to promote conversation and connection.


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IMAGE >   Nicole Monks, Untitled, 2021, grass tree resin, kangaroo skatt, charcoal, drift wood, river reed, shell, kangaroo teeth, echidna quill and eucalyptus, dimensions variable. Image courtesy of the artist.




IMAGE >  Portrait of Nicole Monks. Image courtesy of the artist.
Photograph: PRU AJA

Be bold

The assessment panel considered Nicole’s work drew elegantly from her deep understanding and connection to Country and provided an insightful consideration to the theme of Home.

For Nicole: “Whilst on Country, I have been considering the complex stories behind these traditional materials that were transformed into everyday cultural belongings over such a long time. These natural materials connect us to nature and each other; the rituals surrounding their manufacturing; the collecting and foraging; the seasonal relocation to particular regions of home; the cultural burns; the grinding; and learning and knowledge transfer in the creation of a thriving lifestyle and connected community. How the materiality of an object was the starting point for it stretching out to these deeper facets of cultural upkeep fascinates me.

In considering this I asked myself: could this materiality and connection be integrated into the home of today? How can I keep my connection to country and express my culture and belonging within my belongings? I’m of mixed heritage, so I’ve been developing the ideas of a western table setting made from natural materials found on the journey to Wajarri Yamaji Country. And how this expresses the time and place I find myself today.” 


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